Leah Beeferman

Monitoring the architecture of science: a studious, imaginative investigation of space-bound and land-based far-traveling and distant-looking orbiting and non-orbiting structures

an ongoing weekly project distributed by e-mail running from February 2009 to February 2010.

10 March 2009

Profiling the Delta II “expendable space launch vehicle” in recognition of its 139th successful launch – carrying the Kepler planet-searching telescope into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s launch complex 17 pad 17-B on March 6, 2009, around 10:49pm


Click here to download Monitoring the architecture of science #5 as a high-res PDF.

Posted in definitions, distance, observation, orbit, physics, power, rocket, teamwork, telescope, transport with no comments


Diagramming Earth’s orbits: An investigation prompted by NASA’s NOAA-N Prime weather satellite reaching its polar orbit (2/6/09); the proliferation of orbital debris as two satellites collide in Low Earth Orbit (2/18/09); NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory’s failure to make orbit (2/24/09); and two launches – by Norway and Canada respectively – of new communications satellites into geostationary orbit (Thor 5, 2/11/09 and Telstar 11N, 2/26/09) Leyte Geothermal Prodction Field, Philippines, made up of the 112.5 megawatt (MW) Tongonan Production Field, the 132.0MW Upper Mahiao Power Plant, the 232.0MW Malitbog Power Plant, the 180.0MW Mahanagdong “A” and “B” power plants, and 51.0MW optimization plants – the largest wet steam producing field in the world – generates electricity from geothermal sources to send to Cebu and Luzon, Philippines, via submarine cables