Leah Beeferman

Monitoring the architecture of science: a studious, imaginative investigation of space-bound and land-based far-traveling and distant-looking orbiting and non-orbiting structures

an ongoing weekly project distributed by e-mail running from February 2009 to February 2010.

17 November 2009

On November 13, 2009, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft made its third and final swing-by of Earth, using Earth’s gravity to propel it towards its future destinations: a “close encounter” with asteroid 21 Lutetia in July 2010 and its approach to – and landing on – the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet in mid-2014


Click here to download Monitoring the architecture of science #41 as a high-res PDF.

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NASA’s Mars Reconaissance Orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HIGHRISE) has captured images of the Phoenix lander on Mars’ northern plains, where it has endured a year of wintry conditions and is currently covered in carbon dioxide frost The Cassini spacecraft, orbiting within the Saturn system since 2004, took images in July 2009 revealing significant periodical brightness variation in the planet’s rings; these variations, potentially caused by a collision with comet or asteroid in the 1980s, are characterized by “rippled” or “corrugated” areas that extend for up to 11,000 miles