Leah Beeferman

Monitoring the architecture of science: a studious, imaginative investigation of space-bound and land-based far-traveling and distant-looking orbiting and non-orbiting structures

an ongoing weekly project distributed by e-mail running from February 2009 to February 2010.

25 August 2009

On January 2, 2004, NASA’s Stardust spacecraft passed through the WILD-2 (pronounced VILT-2) comet and gathered samples of its dense gases and dust in a collection grid filled with Aerogel B and sent back to Earth in 2006 on a special capsule; in August 2009, scientists report finding glycine, an amino acid, among the samples brought home


Click here to download Monitoring the architecture of science #29 as a high-res PDF.

Posted in aerogel, amino acid, comet, dust, earth, isotope, life, teamwork with no comments


NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) is pulling a Centaur rocket set to collide with the moon to try and locate hints of lunar ice; this rocket, however, is lined with icicles collected from humid pre-launch air and frozen during launch, icicles which need to be melted before impact so as to not “pollute” findings with traces of Earth water The Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) – three jointly-operated telescopes in Arizona, USA and Coonabarabran, Australia – will soon become the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), a reorganization indicative of a shift in astronomy towards the search for objects that change on short timescales: for example, a star which dims by 7500% in just 10 minutes and fully recovers only 10 minutes later