Leah Beeferman

Monitoring the architecture of science: a studious, imaginative investigation of space-bound and land-based far-traveling and distant-looking orbiting and non-orbiting structures

an ongoing weekly project distributed by e-mail running from February 2009 to February 2010.

11 August 2009

Mid-month data recording the mean orbital height of the International Space Station (ISS) shows the station to be considerably lower in altitude in July than after a January “re-boost”, a standard decline in altitude caused by fluctuating amounts of atmospheric drag


Click here to download Monitoring the architecture of science #27 as a high-res PDF.

Posted in architecture, atmosphere, distance, drag, earth, orbit, space-station with no comments


Wednesday, July 8, 2009 marked the end of repairs on and successful pressure testing of the Large Hadron Collider’s (LHC) sector 3-4; repairs in other sectors of the machine, however, will prevent overall restart and beam injection from happening until mid-November NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) is pulling a Centaur rocket set to collide with the moon to try and locate hints of lunar ice; this rocket, however, is lined with icicles collected from humid pre-launch air and frozen during launch, icicles which need to be melted before impact so as to not “pollute” findings with traces of Earth water