Leah Beeferman

Monitoring the architecture of science: a studious, imaginative investigation of space-bound and land-based far-traveling and distant-looking orbiting and non-orbiting structures

an ongoing weekly project distributed by e-mail running from February 2009 to February 2010.

ocean

Public weather data analyzed by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) – collected from thousands of meteorological stations worldwide, satellite measurements of sea surface temperature, and Antarctic research station data – shows 2009 to be the second warmest year yet recorded

NASA’s Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite (ACRIMSAT) enters its tenth year of monitoring the amount of solar energy reaching the Earth, discovering ties to global warming

Having completed its 43-day stay after successfully docking to deliver 5475 pounds of food, computers, science experiments and related items, Japan’s H-2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV) left the International Space Station (ISS) on Friday, October 30; the bus-sized craft, now carrying 1600 pounds of trash from the ISS, is due to burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere

In the past week, NASA has begun the process of relocating TDRS-1 – a newly retired 25+ year-old tracking and communications satellite – from its geosynchronous orbit to an orbit 300km (136mi) higher, one referred to as “supersynchronous orbit” and “graveyard orbit”

Using its Moderate Resolution Spectrometer (MODIS), NASA’s AQUA satellite detects fluorescent red light emitted from Earth’s ocean photoplankton providing valuable data on the health of the oceans and the plant life within